China-drafted electoral reform bill introduced in Hong Kong.

World News.Hong Kong democracy leaders given jail terms amid Crackdown.

Pro-democracy activists Martin Lee, center, and Albert Ho,

China-drafted electoral reform bill introduced in Hong Kong.

World News.Hong Kong democracy leaders given jail terms amid Crackdown.

HONG KONG (AP) — A Hong Kong court on Friday sentenced five leading pro-democracy advocates, including media tycoon Jimmy Lai, to up to 18 months in prison for organizing and participating in a massive march during 2019 anti-government protests that triggered an overwhelming crackdown from Beijing.

(1 of 13) Pro-democracy activists Martin Lee, center, and Albert Ho, left, arrive at a court in Hong Kong Friday, April 16, 2021. Seven of Hong Kong’s leading pro-democracy advocates, including Lee and pro-democracy media tycoon Jimmy Lai, are expected to be sentenced Friday for organizing a march during the 2019 anti-government protests that triggered an overwhelming crackdown from Beijing.

(2 of 13) Pro-democracy activist Martin Lee, center, arrives at a court in Hong Kong Friday, April 16, 2021. Seven of Hong Kong’s leading pro-democracy advocates, including Lee and pro-democracy media tycoon Jimmy Lai, are expected to be sentenced Friday for organizing a march during the 2019 anti-government protests that triggered an overwhelming crackdown from Beijing.

3 of 13) Pro-democracy activist Martin Lee arrives at a court in Hong Kong Friday, April 16, 2021. Seven of Hong Kong’s leading pro-democracy advocates, including Lee and pro-democracy media tycoon Jimmy Lai, are expected to be sentenced Friday for organizing a march during the 2019 anti-government protests that triggered an overwhelming crackdown from Beijing.

(4 of 13) Pro-democracy activist Martin Lee, center, arrives at a court in Hong Kong Friday, April 16, 2021. Seven of Hong Kong’s leading pro-democracy advocates, including Lee and pro-democracy media tycoon Jimmy Lai, are expected to be sentenced Friday for organizing a march during the 2019 anti-government protests that triggered an overwhelming crackdown from Beijing.

April 16, 2021

A total of nine advocates were given jail terms, but four of them, including 82-year-old lawyer and former lawmaker Martin Lee, had their sentences suspended after their age and accomplishments were taken into consideration.

They were found guilty earlier this month of organizing and participating in a massive protest in August 2019, where an estimated 1.7 million people marched in opposition to a bill that would have allowed suspects to be extradited to mainland China. The march was not authorized by the police.

Their convictions and sentencing are another blow to the city’s flagging democracy movement, which is facing an unprecedented crackdown by Beijing and Hong Kong authorities. The sentences were swiftly met with international criticism.

The court suspended the 11-month prison sentence of Lee, who is known for his advocacy for human rights and democracy, for two years because of his age. Lai, the founder of Hong Kong’s Apple Daily tabloid, was sentenced to a total of 14 months in prison Friday for charges related to demonstration on Aug. 18, 2019, and a separate unauthorized march on Aug. 31, 2019.

Lai was also slapped with two additional charges Friday, one under the national security law accusing him of conspiring to collude with foreign powers and another accusing him of helping local activists to escape the city.

Prior to sentencing, Lai was already being held on other charges, including a previous charge of foreign collusion to intervene in the city’s affairs — a new crime under a sweeping national security law that Beijing imposed on the city in 2020.

Lee Cheuk-yan, a pro-democracy activist and former lawmaker who helped organize annual candlelight vigils in Hong Kong on the anniversary of the bloody crackdown on pro-democracy protests in Beijing’s Tiananmen Square in 1989, was sentenced to a total of 14 months in prison for his participation in the the two August 2019 marches.

Lawyers Albert Ho and Margaret Ng both had their 12-month jail sentences suspended for two years. Former lawmaker Leung Kwok-hung was sentenced to 18 months, while another former legislator, Cyd Ho, was given a jail sentence of eight months.

Two other former lawmakers, Au Nok-hin and Leung Yiu-chung, who previously pleaded guilty, were also given jail sentences. Au got 10 months while Leung’s eight-month jail term was suspended for one year.

In a separate case, former lawmaker Yeung Sum, was sentenced alongside Lai and Lee Cheuk-yan for their participation in the unauthorized assembly on Aug. 31, 2019, although his eight-month sentence was suspended for a year.

“I’m ready to face the penalty and sentencing and I’m proud that I can walk with the people of Hong Kong for this democracy,” Lee Cheuk-yan said ahead of the court session, as supporters held up signs condemning political persecution. “We will walk together even in darkness, we will walk with hope in our hearts.”

Hong Kong had enjoyed a vibrant political culture and freedoms not seen elsewhere in China during the decades it was a British colony. Beijing had pledged to allow the city to retain civil liberties for 50 years after it was handed to Chinese rule in 1997, but recently has ushered in a series of measures, including the national security legislation and electoral reforms that many fear are a step closer to making Hong Kong no different from mainland cities.

Under the new rules, Hong Kong residents can be held liable for any speech or action deemed secessionist, subversive, terrorist or perceived as colluding with hostile foreign political groups or individuals. Electoral changes mean just 20 out of 90 Legislative Council members will be directly elected and Beijing will retain even tighter control over the body that picks Hong Kong’s future chief executives.

Hong Kong’s last British governor, Chris Patten, said that the Chinese Communist Party’s “comprehensive assault” on freedoms of Hong Kong and its rule of law remains relentless. “This week, we have witnessed some of the most distinguished of the city’s peaceful and moderate champions of liberty and democracy placed in Beijing’s vengeful sights,” he said in a statement. “The CCP simply does not understand that you cannot bludgeon and incarcerate people into loving a totalitarian and corrupt regime.”

Amnesty International’s Asia-Pacific regional director, Yamini Mishra, said the sentences handed down Friday underlined the government’s intention to “eliminate all political opposition” in Hong Kong.

“Having arrested the majority of Hong Kong’s most prominent dissidents using the repressive national security law, the authorities are now mopping up remaining peaceful critics under the pretext of bogus charges related to the 2019 protests,” Mishra said.

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The Imperial Queen led UK handed over Hong Kong without the required UN/the Civilized World expected UK/China Joint conducted Hong Kong Citizenry Election of electing HK Prime Minister,as to govern HK well .

HONG KONG (AP) — Hong Kong’s electoral reform bill was introduced in the city’s legislature on Wednesday, setting in motion changes that will give Beijing greater control over the process while reducing the number of directly elected representatives.

(1 of 8) The logo of Hong Kong Special Administrative Region is seen through the glass of a closed door after the first and second meeting of “Improving Electoral System (Consolidated Amendments) Bill 2021” finished at the Legislative Council in Hong Kong Wednesday, April 14, 2021. Hong Kong’s electoral reform bill was introduced in the city’s legislature on Wednesday, setting in motion changes that will give Beijing greater control over the process while reducing the number of directly elected representatives.

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April 14, 2021

The bill is part of efforts to rein in political protests and opposition in Hong Kong, which is part of China but has had a more liberal political system since the 1997 handover from Britain. Political freedoms have been under threat since China imposed a national security law on Hong Kong last year and is now revamping its electoral process as part of a crackdown after months of pro-democracy protests in 2019 that brought hundreds of thousands to the streets.

Hong Kong Secretary for Constitutional and Mainland Affairs Erick Tsang said at a meeting at the legislature that the bill will bolster the national foundation and improve the governance of Hong Kong.

The bill was read for the first and second time on Wednesday. It is expected to pass by the end of May after the third reading with little opposition. All pro-democracy lawmakers resigned in November following the ousting of four of their colleagues who were deemed insufficiently loyal by Beijing.

“This provides a sound foundation to ensure Hong Kong’s system for patriots administering Hong Kong, and will bring the implementation of ‘one country, two systems’ back on the right track,” Tsang said, referring to the semi-autonomy that China promised Hong Kong for 50 years.

In the current 70-member legislature, voters elect half the members and the other half is chosen by constituencies representing various professions and interest groups. Many of those constituencies are pro-Beijing.

The electoral reform bill envisages the legislature with only 20 elected members, 30 chosen by the constituencies and 40 by an Election Committee, which also appoints the city’s leader. The committee, which will be expanded from 1,200 to 1,500 members, is dominated by supporters of the central government in Beijing.

A new, separate body will also be set up to review the qualifications of candidates for office in Hong Kong to ensure that the city is governed by “patriots,” in the language of the central government.

The legislative elections will take place in December.

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China sharply reduces elected seats in the Hong Kong Legislature,which China used as a Trap to receive Hong Kong without the Duly rightful HK Election and to hand over to the HK rightful Citizen,not to the Chinese Appointee that allows China to handle HK as its main-Land or a Region.

HONG KONG (AP) — China has sharply reduced the number of directly elected seats in Hong Kong’s legislature in a setback for the territory’s already beleaguered democracy movement. The changes were announced Tuesday after a two-day meeting of China’s top Legislature.

(1 of 11) From left, Hong Kong Constitutional and Mainland Affairs Erick Tsang Kwok-wai, Chief Executive Carrie Lam and permanent Secretary for Constitutional and Mainland Affairs Roy Tan attend a press conference on the Hong Kong electoral system reform in Hong Kong, Tuesday, March 30, 2021. China’s top legislature approved amendments to Hong Kong’s constitution on Tuesday that will give Beijing more control over the make-up of the city’s legislature.

(2 of 11) Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam attends a news conference on the Hong Kong electoral system reform in Hong Kong, Tuesday, March 30, 2021. China’s top legislature approved amendments to Hong Kong’s constitution on Tuesday that will give Beijing more control over the make-up of the city’s legislature.

(3 of 11) A TV screen broadcasts Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam during a news conference in Hong Kong, Tuesday, March 30, 2021. China’s top legislature approved amendments to Hong Kong’s constitution on Tuesday that will give Beijing more control over the makeup of the city’s legislature.

(4 of 11) Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam listens to a reporter’s question during a news conference on the Hong Kong electoral system reform in Hong Kong, March 30, 2021. China’s top legislature approved amendments to Hong Kong’s constitution on Tuesday that will give Beijing more control over the makeup of the city’s legislature.

(5 of 11) From left, Hong Kong Constitutional and Mainland Affairs Erick Tsang Kwok-wai, Chief Executive Carrie Lam and permanent Secretary for Constitutional and Mainland Affairs Roy Tang attend a press conference on the Hong Kong electoral system reform in Hong Kong, Tuesday, March 30, 2021. China’s top legislature approved amendments to Hong Kong’s constitution on Tuesday that will give Beijing more control over the make-up of the city’s legislature.

(6 of 11) Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam listens to questions during a question and answer session at the Legislative Council in Hong Kong. China’s top legislature approved amendments to Hong Kong’s constitution on Tuesday, March 30, that will give Beijing more control over the make-up of the city’s legislature.

of 11) In this Monday, March 2021 ,file photo, a China national flag, left, and a Hong Kong flag are displayed at the central government office in Hong Kong. China’s top legislature approved amendments to Hong Kong’s constitution on Tuesday, March 30, that will give Beijing more control over the make-up of the city’s legislature.

(8 of 11) Pro-democracy lawmaker Wu Chi-wai, right in polo shirt, scuffles with security guards during a Legislative Council’s House Committee meeting in Hong Kong. China’s top legislature approved amendments to Hong Kong’s constitution on Tuesday, March 30, 2021, that will give Beijing more control over the make-up of the city’s legislature.

(9 of 11) A man walks past a government advertisement to promote the new Hong Kong electoral system reform, in Hong Kong, March 30, 2021. China’s top legislature approved amendments to Hong Kong’s constitution on Tuesday that will give Beijing more control over the make-up of the city’s legislature.

(10 of 11) A man walks past a government advertisement to promote the new Hong Kong electoral system reform, in Hong Kong, March 30, 2021. China’s top legislature approved amendments to Hong Kong’s constitution on Tuesday that will give Beijing more control over the make-up of the city’s legislature.

(11 of 11) People walk past a government advertisement to promote the new Hong Kong electoral system reform, in Hong Kong, March 30, 2021. China’s top legislature approved amendments to Hong Kong’s constitution on Tuesday that will give Beijing more control over the make-up of the city’s legislature.

March 30, 2021

The legislature will be expanded to 90 seats, and only 20 will be elected by the public. Currently, half of the 70-seat legislature — 35 seats — is directly elected. The move is part of a two-phase effort to rein in political protest and opposition in Hong Kong, which is part of China but has had a more liberal political system as a former British colony. China imposed a national security law on Hong Kong last year and is following up this year with a revamp of the electoral process.

The crackdown comes in the wake of months of pro-democracy protests in 2019 that brought hundreds of thousands to the streets and turned violent as the government resisted the movement’s demands. “It’s a very sad day for Hong Kong. The election system is completely dismantled,” said former lawmaker and Democratic Party member Emily Lau.

“They are going to get rid of opposition voices because under this new system, which is so oppressive and restrictive, I don’t think any self-respecting individual will want to take part,” Lau said. China’s top legislature, the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress, amended Hong Kong’s constitution to pave the way for the changes. The Hong Kong government is now tasked with revising its electoral laws and holding an election.

In the current 70-member legislature, voters elect half the members and the other half are chosen by constituencies representing various professions and interest groups. Many of the constituencies lean pro-Beijing, ensuring that wing a majority in the legislature.

The new body will have 20 elected members, 30 chosen by the constituencies and 40 by an Election Committee which also chooses the city’s leader. The committee, which will be expanded from 1,200 to 1,500 members, is dominated by supporters of the central government in Beijing.

Election hopefuls will undergo vetting by the national security police and a committee that oversees national security in the city. A new separate body will also be established to review the qualifications of candidates for office in Hong Kong to ensure the city is governed by “patriots,” in the language of the central government.

The full National People’s Congress rubber-stamped a proposal in mid-March that authorized the Standing Committee to amend the Basic Law, the constitution that has governed Hong Kong since the former British colony was handed over to China in 1997 under a “one country, two systems” framework that promised it semi-autonomy for 50 years.

Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam said at a news conference Tuesday that the new committee to vet candidates will consist of a few government officials who are also trusted by the central government. Lam dismissed concerns that the changes will affect plans for the city to achieve universal suffrage and allow residents to vote for their leader.

“I may as well say this very categorically that the central government is very sincere to give Hong Kong people so-called more democracy, that is, universal suffrage,” Lam said. She blamed pro-democracy lawmakers for objecting in 2014 to a proposal that would have allowed residents to vote for the chief executive on the condition that Beijing would vet the candidates.

“As we move ahead with the current set of improvements in place, then in accordance with Hong Kong’s actual situation and in an orderly and gradual manner … I’m quite certain that we will still have universal suffrage in selecting the chief executive,” she said.

“We just need to act in concert, and make sure that we are not moving away from this very fundamental concept of ‘one country, two systems,’” she said. The political opposition in Hong Kong — which has sought more democracy — sees the changes as part of a broader effort to keep them out of office.

Democratic Party chairman Lo Kin-hei said there are questions whether the new system “can actually reflect what Hong Kong people think and what Hong Kong people believe.” Lo said members of the Democratic Party are still discussing whether they plan to run for election.

“All those changes will affect how we discuss and affect how our party members think about the election system, and whether or not we will fun for election in the future,” he said. In part, it comes down to the definition of patriots. The opposition tried to block legislation by filibustering a key legislative committee for months and disrupting legislative proceedings.

Beijing, which prioritizes political stability, sees these actions as interfering with the governing of Hong Kong and wants to keep these actors out of government. A statement by Beijing’s Hong Kong and Macau Affairs Office said the Hong Kong national security law provided a solid legal foundation to safeguard national security and that the electoral reforms provide a “solid institutional guarantee” of the city’s “one country, two systems” framework and ensure that only “patriots” rule Hong Kong.

The statement also said that with the electoral changes, the relationship between the city’s leader and the legislature will be smoother, and the “various deep-seated contradictions and problems that have plagued Hong Kong for a long time” will be more effectively resolved.

Moritsugu reported from Beijing.

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UK mistakenly handed over HK to the China Appointed Hong Kong Minister,due to the UK interest in the merging of UK Midland Bank Plc with the Chinese HSBC,and to Access the Chinese Market/Commerce & Control Hong Kong Finance/Commerce,which China used as a Trap to receive Hong Kong without the Due rightful HK Election and hand over to HK rightful Citizen not Chinese Appointee that China to handle HK as its Land.

by maziliteralworks

Imperial Queen led UK handed over Hong Kong without the required UN/the Civilized World expected UK/China Joint conducted Hong Kong Citizenry Election of HK Prime Minister,as to govern HK well but UK mistakenly handed over HK to the China Appointed Hong Kong Minister,due to the UK interest in the merging of UK Midland Bank Plc & Chinese HSBC,and to Access the Chinese Market/Commerce & Control Hong Kong Finance/Commerce,which Experts as UK Sold out Hong Kong to China,coupled with the UK failure of not issuing accredited Hong Kong Citizens with the Dual UK-Hong Kong Passports,Now UK misled the World,rom 1 July 1997, and the British Government declared that it would hand over Hong Kong to China and late UK Action is unnecessary.

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